A touch of Versailles comes to Newport in the French-inspired Marble House

A touch of Versailles comes to Newport in the French-inspired Marble House

Marble House - Gilded ballroom

The lavish decoration and exemplar of the Vanderbilt's stature is reflected the Gilded Ballroom

All  that glitters really is gold in the Gilded Ballroom

All that glitters really is gold in the Gilded Ballroom

The Gothic Room — designed for Alva Vanderbilt's collection of Medieval artifacts

The Gothic Room — designed for Alva Vanderbilt's collection of Medieval artifacts

Marble House - Garden event

Marble House is also the perfect outdoor setting for summer celebrations

Marble House - Exterior detail at terrace

Possibly the most ornate rainwater outlets ever...

  • A touch of Versailles comes to Newport in the French-inspired Marble House
  • Marble House - Gilded ballroom
  • All  that glitters really is gold in the Gilded Ballroom
  • The Gothic Room — designed for Alva Vanderbilt's collection of Medieval artifacts
  • Marble House - Garden event
  • Marble House - Exterior detail at terrace

Marble House

Location:

Style:

Built by the grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt as a summer “cottage,” this Gilded Age beauty was a 39th birthday gift to his wife Alva Vanderbilt.

Newport, Rhode Island, was a seaside town widely known as a seasonal resort destination. Leading up to the late 19th century, it was primarily comprised of both large and small wood-framed homes. The Newport Mansions, a group of eleven buildings, changed the face of Newport. They introduced a new level of grandeur and scale.

Marble House was built between 1888 and 1892 as a summer “cottage” for Mr. and Mrs. William Vanderbilt. William was the grandson of Cornelius Vanderbilt, the wealthy railroad magnate. Marble House was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt, who drew his inspiration from the Petit Trianon at the Palace of Versailles. It is an example of Beaux Arts Classicism of the late 19th century, a period in history also known as the Gilded Age in America.

Upon the completion of Marble House, William gave the marble masterpiece to his wife Alva as a 39th birthday present. It has fifty rooms and soon became a social destination and a place for entertaining, particularly by Mrs. Vanderbilt.

The focus of entertainment within Marble House was the Grand Salon, also known as the Gilded Ballroom. Decorated with 22-karat gold wall panels, painted ceiling murals, and carved marble fireplace, this was the Gilded Age at its finest.

Marble House has been a National Historic Landmark since 2006 and is owned by the Preservation Society of Newport County.

 

Images courtesy of the Newport Mansions

Awards and certifications

Below are the awards and accolades gained by Marble House

Contact details

Marble House
596 Bellevue Avenue
Newport, Rhode Island 02480
401.847.1000

http://www.newportmansions.org